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  Previous issue (2019. Vol. 8, no. 1)

Journal of Modern Foreign Psychology

Publisher: Moscow State University of Psychology and Education

ISSN (online): 2304-4977

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17759/jmfp

License: CC BY-NC 4.0

Started in 2012

Published quarterly

Free of fees
Open Access Journal

 

Protest behavior: Individual and group factors

Agadullina E., Ph.D. in Psychology, senior lecturer, National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow, Russia, eagadullina@hse.ru
Lovakov A.V., Junior Research Fellow, Center for Institutional Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow, Russia, lovakov@hse.ru
Abstract
Normative and nonnormative collective actions are the consequence of differences in estimation of political situation. The article regards the predictors in selection of normative (participation in meetings, signing petitions, etc.) vs. nonnormative (strike, violent actions, etc.) forms of protest behavior (perception of unfairness, self-efficacy, social identity, ideas of out-group). The carried out analysis showed that high self-efficacy, idea of out-group members as equal participants of interaction and experiencing of emotion of anger lead to the choice of various normative protest behavior. Low self-efficacy, steady social identity (including politicized identity), experiencing the emotion of contempt to out-group members often lead to choice of nonnormative forms. In conclusion the article regards the link of various predictors with the choice of individual and group forms of protest and analyzes the possible directions for further empirical studies.

Keywords: emotions; social identity; self-efficacy; out-group; protest behavior

Column: Social psychology

For Reference

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