Object working memory load and perceptual similarity in visual search for multiple targets

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Abstract

Subsequent search misses can occur during visual search for several targets. SSM is a decrease in accuracy at finding a second target after successful detection of a first one. Two experiments investigated the effect of object working memory load, target stimuli similarity and the similarity of stimuli in visual search task and working memory tasks on the SSM. It was found that targets perceptual similarity is significant, as well as memory load in case of working memory task and visual search task stimuli similarity. In addition, we found a significant interaction between working memory load and number of shared features between two target stimuli, which may indicate a common mechanism underlying the role of working memory load and perceptual similarity factors.

General Information

Keywords: visual search, subsequent search misses, working memory

Journal rubric: Cognitive Psychology

Article type: scientific article

DOI: https://doi.org/10.17759/exppsy.2019120309

Funding. The study was carried out as part of the HSE Program of Fundamental Studies in 2019.

For citation: Kozlov K.S., Gorbunova E.S. Object working memory load and perceptual similarity in visual search for multiple targets. Eksperimental'naâ psihologiâ = Experimental Psychology (Russia), 2019. Vol. 12, no. 3, pp. 119–134. DOI: 10.17759/exppsy.2019120309. (In Russ., аbstr. in Engl.)

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Information About the Authors

K. S. Kozlov, Research Assistant, Laboratory for Cognitive Psychology of Digital Interfaces User, National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow, Russia, e-mail: kirillskozlov@gmail.com

Elena S. Gorbunova, PhD in Psychology, LAssociate Professor, Head of Laboratory of Cognitive Psychology of Digital Interfaces User, School of Psychology, National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow, Russia, ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3646-2605, e-mail: gorbunovaes@gmail.com

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