Basic concepts in the modern philosophy of social sciences

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Abstract

This article is devoted to the contemporary issues in the philosophy of social sciences. Basic models of social cognition (naturalism, antinaturalism, pluralism, critical approach) are analyzed here. The author investigates the main trends in the philosophy of social sciences and outlines perspectives of the future elaboration.

General Information

Keywords: naturalism, antinaturalism, philosophy of social sciences, pluralism, phenomenological sociology, ideal type, social reality, critical social science, explanation theory, concepts and methods, theories of scientific growth.

Journal rubric: Philosophy

Article type: scientific article

For citation: Kukarnikov D.G. Basic concepts in the modern philosophy of social sciences. Sociosfera = Sociosphera, 2010. no. 4, pp. 14–23. (In Russ., аbstr. in Engl.)

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Information About the Authors

D. G. Kukarnikov, Voronezh State University, Voronezh, Russia

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